Monday, November 11, 2013

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A Non-Kosher Tallis (Prayer Shawl)

A tallit gadol, a Jewish prayer shawl, is a square shawl garment, large enough to enwrap oneself.  Being large enough to cover a man’s body, and being square, it religiously qualifies to need tzitzit, corner fringes.  It’s been a traditional garment used during Jewish prayer for… well, all the way back to the time of the mishnah at least.

To be “kosher”, to fulfill the religious requirements, it must be made from wool or linen, have the corner fringes, and the corner fringes also must be wool or linen (and cannot be linen if the tallit is wool, and vice versa).  It’s traditionally made of wool, most likely due to the availability and price.

The fringes, the tzitzit, must be prepared “for the purpose of the mitzvah” by a Jew (it’s a religious garment and requires a religious preparation).

But it’s just a garment.  Why would a tallis (with tzitzit) need religious certification? …

Tallitl

From the manufacturer…

1. Do you sell with or without the corner fringe (the tzitzit) attached?

We are now producing the tallit with the corner fringe, and we have finished the corner fringe, please check the attached photos.  (While the center garment could be used, the one without tzitzit, Chinese produced tzitzit cannot be kosher.)

2. Do you use new wool or any recycled wool?

As for the tallit, it is 100% Australia wool (no include the stripe), other wool can not reach the good quality and white color.  (Recycled wool or any wool that has any linen, a mix of wool and linen in even the smallest amount, is absolutely prohibited.  In this case they’re fine.)

3. Are your products 100% wool?  Do you manufacture or include any linen?

Our machine only can produce the wool tallit, so we get the string and corner embroidery from other factory.

4. From where do you get the string for the corner fringe (the tzitzit)?  Is it also 100% wool, and do you manufacture it or buy it?

The string is nylon. can be mabe in wool under your requirement. corner fringe is also nylon or polyester.  (Tzitzit must be wool – nylon or polyester is simply not kosher for tzitzit.)

So today you can even get a nice looking cheap tallis from China.  But it’s simply not kosher.

1 comments:

Josh said...

It is too bad that tallitot cost so much overseas and that there is such a high markup after leaving Israel that makes producing in China so lucrative. But even here in Israel, you need to be careful, because I know that at least tallit katan for kids from China and tied in China are widely available. 20NIS a pop are too cheap for something man-made that takes at least 10min to tie.

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