Wednesday, July 24, 2013

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The Salvador Dali Menorah

Sitting just outside the arrivals entrance at Ben Gurion Airport (Tel Aviv – Israel) is a 7 foot golden (colored) menorah sculpture by renowned surrealist artist Salvador Dali.  The particular interesting thing, it’s clear Dali’s imaging of the menorah is NOT a chanukah style menorah (8 arms and a service-arm/candle), but is distinctly in the style (surrealistically speaking) of the Great Menorah of the Beis HaMikdash, the Holy Jewish Temple in Jerusalem.

The Dali Menorah…

2013-07-16 Grandpa Arrives 001

2013-07-16 Grandpa Arrives 002

1 comments:

Yaakov Nathan said...

Rashi and Rambam clearly describe the branches of the menorah as extended upward in a diagonal.

A rendering of the menorah with curved or angular arms is based on the Arch of Titus--carved to emphasize that the Jewish people had been conquered and subjugated by Rome.

"It would be proper to "restore the crown," i.e., all those who make illustrations of the menora (in order to show how the menora looked in the Mishkan and Mikdash) should draw the branches as diagonally coming out of the middle branch.

Rounded menoros (as they are shown on the Arch of Titus) should actually make us cry out, because (and this is most important) it contradicts Rashi and Rambam, etc., and because it gives a certain approbation, etc., ch’v, to the image on the Arch of Titus, which was made to cause pain to the Jews and to disgrace them!

Instead of the shape of the menora arousing Jews to their task of being a "light to the nations," for "it is a testimony to all that the Divine presence rests on the Jewish people," the shape of the [rounded] menora reminds us of exactly the opposite: how Rome was victorious over the Jews!"

(Likkutei Sichos vol. 21, p. 169)

The Menorah

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