Wednesday, December 22, 2004

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The Blessing of Jacob...

The blessing of Yaakov (aka the biblical patriarch Jacob) includes:

"And to you (Yaacov aka Jacob), G-d should give from the dew of the heavens." Berashis (Genesis) 27:28

Standing very late at night in the hills of the Shomron (West Bank) in the summer clouds decent upon the tops of the hills. In front of your eyes the blessing of Yaakov occurs, the dew falls. Not a little moisture on the grass, nor rain. The blessing of dew is a heavy layer of moisture coating everything. The plants grow, and with a little ingenuity, you can fill a bucket with sweet dew using a tilted sheet.

You say you do not see blessings in front of your eyes today? Stand and watch the blessing of Yaakov as the dew falls in the Shomron (West Bank). 3,000 years after the blessing was given, you can see it for yourself today.

The blessing was given to Yaakov (Jacob) and not to Esau. The dew falls on the tops of the hills as the clouds decend, not in the valley's. In the Shomron (West Bank) today, the Arab villages and towns all are located in the valley's, while the Jewish villages and towns are located on the hilltops.

The blessing falls on the children of Yaakov (Jacob). Coincidence? For those who see only the natural, of course it is. For those who see the blessings and promises of G-d, a miracle in front of your eyes.

By 9:00 am, the dew is only a memory in the heat of the day.

The Prayer For Dew - With His consent, I will speak of the hidden things amidst this people, to bring them joy through this prayer for dew. Dew - to gladden the earth and its herbage that rejoice and are happy in His protective shade. Dew - the symbol of youth, to protect our progeny...

Let dew sweeten like honey the crops of the mountains, let Your chosen ones savor Your goodness, deliver Your beloved ones from bondage, then we will raise our voices and sing sweet songs - with dew.


There are many kabbalistic allusions to dew. Yet while the deepest meanings can be found, the simple meaning, especially when it's in front of your eyes, can be the most profound.

Credit to my daughter for this post, her words and thoughts from summer in the Shomron (West Bank) and a little editing by me.

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